iphone - How to pass the endless verifying status on iMessage or FaceTime activation when phone number is wrong?

18
2014-04
  • sorin

    My iMessage continues to show Verifing status on iPhone 4S (iOS 5.1).

    • The phone number displayed at iMessage verifing screen is wrong (old one)
    • The Settings > Phone displays the correct number
    • iTunes shows correct number
    • The phone can successfully send or receive SMS messages

    I already tried the accepted answer from https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3401647?start=0&tstart=0 but it does not work.

  • Answers
  • Coyote

    I assume you changed phones/data plans and restored your iPhone from backup?

    The only time I encountered quite important problems with my iPhone's setup was when I made a backup (in iTunes) sold my iPhone (3G) flew to a new country bought a new iPhone (4) with a new provider and setup the new iPhone by restoring restoring from backup. From that point my network settings went bad and I experienced numerous issues (visual voicemail, FaceTime and internet access were not working properly or at all).

    To solve the problem I had to restore the iPhone and then setup the iPhone as a new iPhone. It was the only thing that worked for me. You could try that.

  • sorin

    This is quite a common problem that can be solved by turning off and on iMessages. You may want to wait a little bit between these operations.


  • Related Question

    ipad - How does iPhone's facetime work even when the phone function is off?
  • kellyllek

    It's a bit inconvenient that iPhone's FaceTime can only be used on WiFi. And yet you call people by using their numbers.

    But my mom's iPad only has wifi and she has no number, and I call her iPad via my iPhone by using her email address. I don't quite understand how it knows her iPad and makes the connection? Is it through her Apple ID?

    What's doubly confusing is when I traveled to Europe for a couple months I put my iPhone account on hold; so text and phone did not work. I kept the wifi on though. But I was blown away that mom could still call me from her iPad. Somehow FaceTime worked though WiFi with my phone number even though my phone account was turned off? I'm assuming it somehow associated my number with my Apple ID, but wow, I'm confused?


  • Related Answers
  • BoltClock

    Initially Apple used the phone number as the FaceTime "account" and non-user-visible SMS validation as the "password" to avoid forcing end users to enter/remember/forget yet another set of credentials.

    The SMS validation happens behind the scenes - but SMS does have to be active on the phone at the time of first verifying (and potentially when re-verifying?) your FaceTime account on Apple's servers. If you switch off FaceTime in the Phone settings, wait a few seconds and turn it back on - you can see this checking process. The status message will change to say "Waiting for activation..." until Apple's servers verify your account. Once it says "Your phone number will be shared with people you call with FaceTime." the account is verified.

    You can now use AppleID for credentials for devices that do not have SMS and an easily accessed/understood phone number. SMS is needed one time at activation to ensure Apple's push notification goes to the correct device - there shouldn't be a problem dropping SMS later once the device is registered.

    This data lets the address book facilitate dialing and location over WiFi. Apple runs servers that let each device check in and request to initiate a call if the receiver is online anywhere. There is no technical reason why FaceTime cannot use cellular data for the call (bits are bits) but in practice the carriers would probably have to charge more for supporting everyone video chatting on networks that are currently straining to contain the data already flowing over them.

    On devices that allow an email address - if someone calls you - all the devices currently on ring but only one picks up. For example, it's possible to receive incoming FaceTime calls ringing on a Mac, an iPod touch and an iPad - and any one can pick up the "call".